feminismandflowers
It’s easy to say “don’t give people so much power to hurt you,” but that does not address our need for connection and acceptance. It does not account for the very healthy impulse to seek feedback on our perceptions of the world. I believe that the healthiest person, when persistently rejected, will witness either an erosion of their mental boundaries or an erosion of their ability to engage in intimacy. I also believe that the only way to maintain good mental boundaries, to counteract social rejection, and to assess when to disengage, is to have strong self-knowledge and self-confidence, and to engage in self-compassion and care. In other words, to engage in behaviors that build your self-esteem.
feminismandflowers

commiekinkshamer:

i mean i get that it’s confusing for non-OCD sufferers to understand why, for example, we can hug or kiss another person but be terrified to shake hands. or unable to touch doorknobs but able to touch money or even a toilet seat, etc etc. this illness is based on irrational fears that rarely follow logic, and can be mysterious even to the sufferer. that’s the characteristic of anxiety disorders and OCD is no exception. so please don’t ask us why we are afraid of some things but not another or try to say we’re faking or exaggerating because if we really had OCD, we would be in the washroom scrubbing our hands 12 hours a day or what have you. also there are different types of OCD and not all revolve around cleanliness, checking, organization or have compulsive components. a person can suffer from OCD and show no external symptoms at all, often leading to a misdiagnosis like “General Anxiety”. Pure O, for example, is based mainly in the obsessive part and usually revolve around morally repulsive things, like fearing you’re a pedophile, will hurt your family or yourself, or “what if” thought  spirals etc.